Warning: Living in a VUCA world can cause headaches, project delays, upset stomach, cost overruns, shortness of breath, a lack of engagement, anxiety, rework, retraining and numbness. If your VUCA symptoms last more than four hours, consult your change management practitioner.

Warning: Living in a VUCA world can cause headaches, project delays, upset stomach, cost overruns, shortness of breath, a lack of engagement, anxiety, rework, retraining and numbness. If your VUCA symptoms last more than four hours, consult your change management practitioner.

CHANGEGUILD's Dan Olson was recently interviewed by Theresa Moulton on her Change Management Review Podcast. In case you missed it, you can find it here, or you can listen to it below.

Theresa is a leader in the change management profession globally, and her website is an excellent resource for all levels of change management skill. Here's a partial list of questions she asked Dan:

  1. How did you get into the field of change management?
  2. What topic or topics do you think are most relevant to change management professionals today?
  3. Do companies really have a full view of all the projects and changes that are going on?
  4. Why do you think that a change management professional should know about the future of change management?
  5. What is it about Agile that you think is most important for change management professionals and why?
  6. What practices have you seen in Change Management that just flat-out don’t work anymore?
  7. If you could give one piece of advice to a newcomer to the change management field, what would it be?
I would say that the very autocratic top-down approaches are the biggest thing I see falling flat. There is often that conversation about, “Well, I don’t want to spend money on Change. That’s the Kumbaya touchy-feely stuff. The change must happen. We have to deploy this ERP project.” From a risk mitigation point of view, that shove-change-down-peoples’-throats mentality just is too costly. People are so unsettled and scared about the future in general as it is.

The other thing I would say is an overdependence on using a pencil-whip Change methodology. You must learn to be nimble and use what’s in the system – to be clever and overt, or covert. depending upon the moment and what the client needs.
— Dan Olson on what doesn't work in Change Management